Tuesday, September 14, 2010

If I could have one wish for Davy it would be.... That she could have one body builder sized, plump, blood filled vein in her arm. You have no idea how nice that would be. It has taken 5 days, three different labs and 7 different Phlebotomists(nice vocab huh?) too draw blood from this little birds arm. I had to constrain Davy while the techs were stabbing her over and over again. The best was their conversation, " Hmmm...... is this a vein? Maybe. I guess we could try it." Uhhh, excuse me?!!! Maybe you want to make sure that's a vein before you stick that bad boy in my baby's flesh! After many attempts, I was sent to Choc to have it done. As soon as they put the rubber band around Davy's arm she turned into the incredible hulk baby. I have never seen this little lumpy be so strong. She started thrashing and screaming as loud as her little clefty would let her. I held my tears in and calmly whispered to her "good girl Davy, good girl." Which I think just pissed her off even more. Serious Mom? Good girl?!! This dude is trying to kill me and that's all you got for me?!! It was the only thing I could think to do for her. Aside from getting the H out of that room. But these are important labs. They will tell us if all the meds she is taking for Hypopituitarism are doing their job. So I stayed and held her tight like a good mom should.
I am happy to report that Jaime the king of Phlebotomists was able(after 10 + stabs) to draw the blood necessary. I can now check torturing my daughter off my to do list.

26 comments:

Aimee said...

I saw your blog on Cjane today. :) We've had similar struggles with my son (born premature and suffered complications in the NICU)... at the first blood draw he had when he didn't flinch or cry out, I wasn't sure if I should be proud of how strong he was, or sad that he had gotten so used to needle sticks. (He's got bad veins, too.) The "torture" part of it all is so gut-wrenching! I've read through quite a bit of your blog today - you're a good, strong, and inspiring mom!

Corrie said...

I'm another new reader who has come through CJane.

oh that breaks my heart, I am terrible at seeing my little ones have their needles let alone lots and lots of needles. Oh you're braver and tougher than me and I'm sure Davy still loves you lots and lotsxxxx I think you both must be tough nuts to survive that ordeal!
Corrie;)

Christy said...

Ruth, I've got the same type of veins. I remember as a little girl when I had pneumonia having them stick me 5-10 times when they needed to take tests or put in IV's. Even to this day, the phlebotomists have a hard time with it. But I've learned to always tell the techs that I have invisible veins and most everyone cannot find a vein. For some reason, this challenges them and want to be "the one" to get it right the first time. When I had my DNC with the miscarriage, they gave up after 3 tries...so they called the anesthesiologist. They're amazing with needles. They have to be. Insist on them with Davy. He put a needle in a place in my wrist no one has ever tried.

Damaris said...

I've been through that with my son, but less dramatic and I was so full of sorrow.

You are brave. I know you have to be, but still.

Hope she has a restful day.

Jennifer Bertrand said...

Hi!!! A friend just shared your blog and I love it!! (Your photos are beautiful!!!) Our son, Winston, was born with a mixed venous and lymphatic malformation.....basically he was a bullfrog upon birth and after lots of treatments and surgeries he's not a fabulously cute, Chris Farley with a trach and feeding tube! (Still thinking how we will top last year's Halloween costume of Ron Burgundy!!!) Long story short, love your blog!!! Winston's blog is sounds cheesy but I have a dark sense of humor to go with the cheese....http://hugsforthesoul.blogspot.com/
Our story is a bit bizarre that in one year I won a reality show (HGTV's Design Star Season 3, got pregnant, 7 weeks NICU, Winston died on us once and Chris saved him, lots of PICU stays and flying to NYC for treatments!!! It's funny what life throws at you, isn't it!!! And please tell your husband we love us some Yo Gabba Gabba!!! For Winston's first birthday Chris, Winston and I all dressed up as DJ Lance! :) Have a lovely day and thank you for sharing your blog!!! jen bertrand

Stephanie said...

poor little nugget.

Jennifer Bertrand said...

I should totally proofread what I write before I post! Sorry for the sloppy post on your site! :)

Little stay at home momma said...

My friend just showed me your blog. So cute and your little Davy is so sweet. I have a little girl named Davy too! Where did you come up with the name?

Georgia said...

That STINKS! I'm am glad, though, that they got it done!

JEM said...

My sister had the same horrible problem with her little boy. They found out the best vein finders are the life-flight paramedics, and they took to asking for them.... I hope she has a few weeks without torture!

The Bogren's said...

Poor Davy!! I would have been a mess!! So hooray for being a super mom!!

Heather said...

Totally random, but, I heard (a long, long, long time ago) that when your kids (or babies) get shots, that you aren't supposed to talk. That they can and will associate your voice (and all that goes on with the taking of the shots ie. the rubber band, the swabbing of the arm, the needle) with that pain. That you are just supposed to hold them (silently), and when it's over, then you give them your most gentlest mommy voice of support and care and love. I'm not sure if it (always) works, but that's what I do, especially when they are younger than a year or two old. My 11 yr. old is great with getting shots, the 9 yr. old has a phobia of needles, and the 4 yr. old and 2 yr. old don't like shots at all. But they are ALL little troopers just like Davy will be when she gets older.

Jody said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jody said...

Our little guy had to get some blood drawn at the childrens hospital, their trick to find veins in kids was to turn out the room lights and shine a portable lamp under their arm, and magically you can see their veins through their arm, like we can see through our hands with a flash light. it worked like a charm. good luck with your cutie.

Julie said...

I too found your blog on CJane and cannot tear myself away! I am also a sucker for a big clefty grin. Visit us to see four years into the future, a tiny pink scar on a lovely little girl named Zoe.

Rochelleht said...

I really thought in those early years, that my Ethan would hold it against me, all those trips to the lab. BRUTAL!!! But, happily, he can't remember it. And honestly, it's fading in my memory, too. THANK GOODNESS!!!

Vickie Blanchard said...

My 14 month old had a negative experience with a blood draw last week---this definitely puts it in perspective though. So hard to go through! On a less serious note, my daughter has the same skirt---well, she hasn't worn it in a while since it's size 3-6 months, but it makes me feel like I have some hope of being stylish if my girl has something your daughter has!

Charise said...

Hi hunnie,
Once you find someone who knows what they are doing... write it down and get their number, so that you can call and check their schedule. For over a year, there was only one person I allowed to touch Cole with a needle. Some people just have the right know how.... and they are priceless people to know! I even began taking cookies to mine!

I have definitly found that no one ever gets ticked by my bringing them treats, and they always seem to remember it. And who knows when I am going to need them to really like me.

(Case in point... I ALWAYS get the best rooms at the Ronald McDonald Floor of the CHOC Hospital!) Let me know if you ever stay overnight there and I can give you tips!

Love you and I am proud of you cousin!!
Charise
www.brighton-cole.blogspot.com

Charise said...

Oh yeah... Also, remember where they have success. Cole has certain areas that are great... but they are never the blood guys first choice spots.

Also, you never need to feel bad on insisting on something for your baby at the dr.

jenifer said...

my 18 month old, fell into the coals of a campfire and severely burned her palms. it was hell for a year... and the worst was IVs.
once, after a hellish morning, my mother in law called. i heard my husband say, "we had a great day once they got an IV line in." i wanted to SCREAM... that little statement "once we got an iv line in" represented a whole, rip my heart out, life time of torture that no innocent child should ever have to endure.

And yet, she is 8 now, and smiling and happy... and she doesn't even remember iv hell.
but a mother NEVER forgets.
i'm right there with you.

Niki Carter said...

Another CJane reader here. Your story is amazing. I have always wondered about the creators of Yo Gabba Gabba. How do you guys get so many celebrities to come on?? Anyway, your baby girl is just beautiful! I had a baby girl six years ago with a cleft lip and it now seems like a distant memory. I know that you have a lot of other things to deal with but it is so nice to get past this one hurdle that is so visible to everyone else. I wish you the best of luck. Visit us sometime. Her name is Rachel - she is the brunette.

Midori said...

Hi Ruth,
I found your blog through a friend of a friend of a friend. :) My husband happened to be looking over my shoulder as I was looking thru your archives. He is a resident and operated on your daughter! What a small world. :) Feel free to email me for the whole story.

Midori
nakanovich@mac.com

Lindsay said...

I too came over from Cjane. What a great blog you have! I'm so sorry your beautiful Davy has had so many pokes. It makes my mommy/nurse heart hurt. Have you read the book Half Baked? If you're interested, drop me a line and I'll send it your way. LAN2249 AT gmail DOT com. Blessings, Lindsay.

Jessica Crozier said...

Ruth, I wrote on Carol Joy's post. My daughter also has special needs. Also has had collapsed veins from too much poking. At 6 years old she still isn't used to it. Not that I blame her. I saw at the end the bloodwork is to check to see if her hypopituitary meds are working. Is she pan-hypo-pit? Emma is diagnosed with septo optic dysplasia and optic nerve hypoplasia, being hormone deficiient. She's on cortef, levothyroxin, and growth hormone (among other meds). Just curious if our girls rock the same dx's!
Best,
Jessica
www.jumpingwaves.com

Jan S said...

I believe, as one other commenter suggested, that they can use a special light to find hard-to-see veins! Worth requesting!! It also helps to "warm up" the arm prior to the draw. (Just a warm blanket on the arm will do.) But I would definitely ask for them to use the light device. Also, all medical professionals know that it's almost always incredibly hard to see a baby's veins. SO don't be afraid to get really pushy and demand to see the head phlebotomist for other techniques in drawing sweet Davy's blood. Neither one of you deserve to suffer through that!!

Amanda said...

Do they use EMLA at all? That might be difficult since they would have to pretty much coat all four limbs with the stuff.

As an anesthesia professional I can make a couple of recommendations: ask (demand) an anesthesia provider, or a NICU/PICU nurse. Phlebotomists are great but unless they do a lot of children they may not be as good as the others. Also it is possible to use ultrasound to locate peripheral veins. If the facility has an IV team they will know how to use it.